April 1st, 2017

Unfinished Mail

Roller Coaster
 
I’m writing this at the tail of March. March has been a roller coaster. I ended up having an emergency medical procedure come out of nowhere that instantly slowed me down when I wanted to speed up. I’m still recovering from that and am hard at work on the April issue.
 
This month’s issue focuses on 2 big festivals: Canadian Music Week & Vans Warped Tour. Canadian Music Week is a week-long festival that brings in artists from across the world. The majority are Canadian. It is a chance to see who is emerging after SXSW and also look North for new artists. CMW also includes the Music Cities Convention which is drawing our attention more than ever before. Music Cities brings in government officials to see what is working & not working for cities & the music industry. Our recent exploration into venue issues has made us a follower of music cities.
 
Vans Warped Tour is a multi-city alternative music festival. We’ve been covering it for years. The tour won’t start until later in the year but in April we try to find 1-2 artists to profile once the bands are announced. Last year VWT happened in Denver the same weekend as another festival. We did both. This year VWT is happening in June which is a welcome surprise.
 
April marks the first quarter of the year. Everything will only get busier after this. It is now concert season and soon it will be festival season. 2017 is becoming one of the biggest years for music releases, tours and festivals. 

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March 1st, 2016

Unfinished Mail – March 2016

gloria Steinem

Gloria Steinem

Last month we looked at women tour managers. Some of the answers to the questions caught my attention and made me think. A common question I ask is “As a woman in the music industry, have you been discriminated against?” The answers have always surprised me and have changed from generation to generation. Some of the defensive reactions from women tour managers make me ask “Why do I ask the question?” and “Is the question still relevant?”
FEMMUSIC is a narrow niche magazine. It is not unique. There are many other magazines that cover women in music. There are also many magazines that cover music that do a once yearly “women’s issue.” I’ve tried to make FEMMUSIC unique. I try to target my interviews and content to hit a broad base of musicians because I feel that is what musicians want to read. I’ve also become more of a content re-distributor than I was in the past. Finally I take a hard feminist view on sites and films I will feature. I feel that this appeals to my readers.
Feminism is almost a taboo word in modern culture. It is associated with NOW and other organizations that sought to break the glass ceiling. Gloria Steinem is now 2 generations removed from modern day. She is the boomer generation. Modern feminists include Sheryl Sandberg, Sophie Amoruso and Anita Sarkeesian. These women are not just fighting for equality but the roles of women in modern society. It was only recently that Ash Carter, US Defense Chief, allowed women to be eligible for combat roles in all branches of the US military. This is a recent and profound victory since much of the world has had women in combat for decades, if not centuries.
As readers of FEMMUSIC, are you still interested in having the question asked? Is the question relevant to you? Do you want more of the focus to be just music? I think the narrative changes because of the women’s perspective in all facets of music. I’m curious about that. Are you? What changes would you like to see?
I still view discrimination as an ongoing problem. I see it at every show I’m at. The arts have it in numerous ways. If the ERA passed tomorrow women would still be paid less in music because the arts work differently. Do you agree? Why or why not? Please let me hear your voice.

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August 1st, 2015

Words From the Editor’s Desk

editor's desk

 
It has now been 16 years since I started FEMMUSIC. At the time my biggest questions were “How can I make this work?” and “Will it survive?” It was summer of 1999 and there were more Dot coms out there with lots of advertising money. It was the wild wild west of the internet. Six months later it was the Dot Com Bust and the landscape became barren. Those of us who were independent and self financed found ourselves in a world of our own. That is when FEMMUSIC went from trying to be a local magazine to an international one.
 
Now I’m a different person from back then. I hear different things in the music than I did before. Songs are still a 3 minute love affair. As a writer and artist I’ve always found music activated the visual part of my mind. I could “see” the images and descriptions in music. I also approach the artist differently. At one time hearing THE SONG I would fall in love with the artist. Now I fall in love with the song: the structure, the mechanisms.
 
I’m now asking questions I used to never ask. The biggest is “Can I change the world?” I’ve heard from many artists over time how I’ve made an impact. I’m gratified but I’d like to do more. I’m a newshound. I’m an idealist and a romantic. I believe in larger pictures. I’ve never thought that “soft” news i.e. entertainment changes the landscape. I think artists DO change the world but journalists don’t get the same opportunity. I’m now working on a project that hopefully can DO more.   It is moving slowly and I don’t want to have it fail before it starts. I hope it can have a larger impact than I have before. I hope…I dream… 16 years ago I didn’t think FEMMUSIC was possible. 
____________________________________________________________________________________
 
It’s nearly August and I’m more than running behind. I have fears the new issue will be up on deadline. It’s been a big month of shows. I’ve also been looking for groups to be involved in to push the arts locally. I’ve applied to one and hope to hear word. I hope it will be a chance to do something with impact now and in the future.
 
                                                                           Sincerely,
                                                                           Alex Teitz
                                                                           Editor-In-Chief
                                                                           FEMMUSIC

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January 1st, 2015

Words from the Editor’s Desk

editor's desk

It’s December 12 and two weeks from Christmas and three weeks from 2015. I have 8 shows remaining in 2014 including 2 tonight. Last night while returning from seeing a Canadian band I was listening to artists from the UK and NYC. Both are them are featured in this issue.
2014 was the test run on FEMMUSIC coming back and it went better than I expected. 2015 we are charging ahead and already have ideas for issues for the New year. We also will be covering more artists than ever. I already have tix in hand for shows going to April. By March we will be eyeing the summer and by June will be eyeing the Fall.
Our goals are to cover more, hear more and find more artists and bring them to you. We already have a pile of January advance albums at our feet. What are your goals for 2015. Release an album? Play more gigs? Increase fan base? Write more songs? Where are you in planning to do this? Do you have an outline? Budget? Now is the time do it. December & January are the sleeping months in the industry. Typically everyone records when it is cold & dark outside. It is also the best time to plan.
It is 3 weeks until 2015 and I’m wrapping up work early on the January issue so I can have some time to relax. I also know January & February will have earlier deadlines for our issues. I want to review more music in the coming year without giving up live shows. These are my goals.
By the time you read this it will be 2015. 
Signing
 
Okay I have an amendment. A few days agoI found out a local artist I’ve been following for this year was signed to a label deal. I sent out congratulatory e-mails and spoke with some friends. All of them were cautiously optimistic hoping that the contract was good.
By that note I decided I would add my 2 cents here. A label contract is still a big thing. Before the internet age it would make or break an artist. Now the stakes are different but if you sign a bad contract you still can be in trouble.
I’ve heard countless bad stories of bad contracts. There is the 3 album deal. You are required to do 3 albums with the label and they pay for marketing, distribution, etc…as a loan that your royalties pay off. The label has control. You do the first album and unless it goes gold or platinum you may not get money to make a second album. If you can’t make a 2nd album, you can’t make a third and you are trapped.
Commonly today you see the partnership. You and the label share costs. You pay the road expenses but the label does distribution and radio. The label is aiming to recoup less money so your volume sales can be smaller.
When you sign to a label you want to be a full functioning organization. If you can control your sales, publishing, videos, touring…the label has less to offer you and you can negotiate from a place of strength. If you don’t have that big an organization the label has more leverage. As always, with any label contract it is common sense to have management & an attorney review it before signing.

Sincerely,

                                                        Alex Teitz, Editor-In-Chief

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December 1st, 2014

Words from the Editor’s Desk

cake!

November has been a busy month. November is my birthday and I always treat myself to the Starz Denver Film Festival. For two weeks I’m immersed in film. This year I also had a few concerts during it. The birthday itself was unspectacular. The festival was a chance to catch up with good friends I only see once a year.
This month we’re doing our first BEST OF issue in many years. As you read you’ll notice many of these artists we saw live. Live music is a driving force of FEMMUSIC. What you can hear on a recording can pale to a good live show. As of November we’d seen 120 shows not including festivals and are eyeing even more in December. Our calendar is already filling with shows for 2015. I expect by January we may have shows in May already listed.
I’m personally looking forward to January. There is a slim chance the weather will be so bad and the number of shows will decrease that we can imagine sleeping and beginning to get caught up on album reviews. I can dream.

Sincerely,

                                                        Alex Teitz, Editor-In-Chief

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June 1st, 2014

Words from the Editor’s Desk

Years ago a local newspaper columnist I knew would do a story annually on bad behavior at concerts. It was a popular column and the feedback from readers with their own horror stories would make you laugh & cringe. Last night I was at a sold out show at witnessed this bad behavior in action once again. In honor, and homage to my friend Mark Brown, I give you the modern take on live music concert etiquette.
 
                When going to a concert we are all seeking the same thing: to have fun. The band is there for that. The audience is there for that. The problem is some people’s idea of fun, is not always the same as everyone else’s. Your behavior can, at a minimum, be considered rude, and, at a maximum, be illegal and enough to get you tossed from the venue. Here are the DO’s and DON’T’s of concerts:
1.       DON’T sing every word to every song that the band is playing. They already know the words, and the people around paid to hear the band sing, not you.
2.       DO sing to the band when they ask everyone to sing along.
3.       DON’T scream out band members names at any opportunity. They know their own names and don’t need you to remind them.
4.       DO scream & clap appreciation for solos, and songs with the rest of the audience.
5.       DON’T talk through the band’s set. If you want to talk, go outside the venue or someplace where you don’t interfere with the rest of the audience. This is true of the opening act, or anyone who is performing. People paid to hear these people NOT you.
6.       DON’T scream “Freebird” or any of the other usual song requests. The band has a set list. Some may ask for audience participation, but drunkenly screaming out something they NEVER play does not win you points.
7.       DON’T get drunk. You may see yourself as the master of the universe when drunk but most likely, everyone around you doesn’t. If you get too drunk you WILL get tossed from a venue. If you don’t, and act like an ass, you will be remembered, ridiculed and punished.
8.       DON’T get stoned. See number 7.
9.       DON’T stand up for a song, or set when everyone around you is sitting down. You will block someone’s view and that ruins their fun.
10.   DON’T text, talk or photograph the entire concert or set. In the smartphone era a generation has been raised to believe that you can’t actually brag that you were at a show without demonstrating you are AT a show. Professional photographers have the first 3 songs to capture the best of the band. They have better cameras and a better view than you. Take a few shots but remember the joy of a concert is BEING there. It is called a concert experience because everyone is present. If you can’t look up from your phone, you are not.
11.   DON’T quote me the set. You may have seen the band 20 times and memorized their facebook, and twitter. You may be the ultimate fan and know them by name, age and social security number. If you want your band to get more popular it is because they attract NEW fans beyond just you. You want the person next to you to experience what you did as NEW. If you blab about every song, every second, they may walk out and that is a lost fan & sale for your band.
DO have fun. Remember that everyone around you wants to as well. Often times I go to shows to see how a band does live. I may have never seen them. I meet the excited fans who know every detail of the artist’s life. I learn some things from them, but the experience I get is to see them perform.

Sincerely,

                                                        Alex Teitz, Editor-In-Chief

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November 1st, 2002

  Words from the Editor’s Desk

As I write this I’m amazed at the way this year continues to develop. New things are happening daily beyond the walls of FEMMUSIC. As we catch up on this year, and get ready for the voting for the Top Ten Independent Bands & Artists of 2002, the New Year is already beckoning with surprises.

I’ve wanted to write about this next subject for some time. Ironically as I’ve gotten closer, it has had a real effect personally. The subject is money. How much is your career worth? I’ve been directly involved in some CD releases recently and have been surprised how many people will pour their soul into making the CD but will forget the that having a website and decent contact info is as important. If it costs you $10-15,000 to do a CD, isn’t it worth it to pay $500 to make a website that will properly represent you? Many people forget this.

In the 21st Century no artist can survive two minutes in the real world without a website. It is your billboard to say who you are and what your music is. Although free websites abound, to the press and the media, an AOL or Geocities website tells us that your career isn’t important enough to buy a URL. If your website is filled with ads, and flash everywhere I will walk away.

Building a website requires planning and thought. It should have a way to reach whomever will speak for the band. It should have decent photos so a reader can tell what you look like. It should have a band biography, and individual biographies. It MUST HAVE your gigs updated regularly. It should also have downloadable songs so we can see what you sound like. Beyond that you can go crazy with adding lyrics, fan pages, journals, etc…

I’ve always been someone who does put their money where their mouth is. It’s who I am. FEMMUSIC is professional because we talk with the best people and work with a company I believe in, www.PossibilityPromotion.com

If you’re going to get involved in this business you have to go all the way. If you don’t, it will reflect on you. More than enough said.

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August 1st, 2002

  Words from the Editor’s Desk

   Preparing to write this unfinished mail column has been the hardest part of this issue. Why? To those who know me I can be ten feet tall and bask in every moment, every note. To those who know me best, I’m still tired, scared and surprised with every success. I am a modest person and lighting the fireworks on an anniversary that I never expected is truly amazing.
Three years is a long time. It is not the milestone of five, ten or twenty, but it is the goalmarker towards them. As many of my friends, who are parents, can attest to; three years is long enough for a child to walk, talk and talk back. Three years is time enough for most cars to depreciate value by $10-20,000. In the music industry, three years is time enough to roll out two albums.
Three years ago I thought FEMMUSIC would be a nice side project. I could spend 10 hours a week reviewing CD’s, doing show reviews, and interviewing artists. Three years later, I have a small staff, an amazing photographer, and eat, drink and sometimes sleep FEMMUSIC.
In three years I’ve spoken to some amazing artists. I’ve spoken to Grammy, Juno and Aria winners. I’ve spoken to legends like Odetta, Yoko Ono, Janis Ian, Marcia Ball. I’ve also spoken to tons of independent artists. My favorites include Jennifer Terran, Rita Di Ghent, Lis Harvey, Willow, and so many more.
Anniversaries, like birthdays, are celebrations of what has come before and what is still ahead. Considering how this summer has been, the sky is the limit. I have more work to do, as always. Thank you for reading. Thank you for writing. Thank you for believing. The best is yet to come.

FEMMUSIC
Attn: Alex Teitz
1550 Larimer St #511
Denver, CO 80202

   Finally, I would like to welcome Tom to our staff. In the few days I’ve spoken with him I know he will amaze everyone. Now let’s hope I remember July before it disappears.

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June 1st, 2002

  Words from the Editor’s Desk

snake

   June snuck up on me like a snake. It was a good May and a lot has been going on. Looking at the new issue, I’m wondering when more will happen. This month I wanted to talk about some e-mails I’ve been receiving. They caught my attention, and I had to talk about them.
One e-mail I received asked if FEMMUSIC could tell her when a FEMMUSIC artist was coming to town. My first reaction was, “a FEMMUSIC artist?” FEMMUSIC doesn’t do booking. FEMMUSIC is not in artist management. FEMMUSIC doesn’t brand artists. You won’t see a FEMMUSIC tour any time soon. FEMMUSIC is a publication as much as Rolling Stone or Billboard. Our mission is to show new artists to anyone willing to see them. We say good things about artists because we mean it.
Another letter I received spoke about “The Place for Emerging Women in Music.” What does that phrase mean?” Surely I don’t mean artist like Jann Arden, Odetta, Janis Ian and numerous others are “emerging.” They aren’t. FEMMUSIC is a place where artists on any level of development can come and read about other artists at any level of development. It helps to hear what one person’s experiences are. FEMMUSIC has always believed in mentoring, and believes that our interviews and features provide that for every performing reader.
FEMMUSIC is coming up on our third year anniversary in August. To celebrate I’ve decided to do a special issue outside of what we normally do. The issue will focus on Women Activist Musicians in Generation Y (age 20-30). I’ve run into a problem doing this issue. I’m having trouble finding both the artists and the causes. I’m asking you, our readers for help. Names like Dar Williams, Michelle Shocked, Ani DiFranco have been brought up, but they are too old. Who will be the next Ani, Indigo Girls, Joan Baez, etc….If you have suggestions, please e-mail me at [email protected]
As I write this I’m thinking about another show I’ll be at tonight. It’s summer and I won’t sleep until Fall. That’s all from the Editor’s desk. Until July…

Sincerely,
Alex Teitz
Editor-In-Chief
FEMMUSIC

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May 1st, 2002

  Words from the Editor’s Desk

   The past month has moved faster than I ever expected. We are in summer and the shows keep coming faster and faster. I, personally, have become involved in a number of projects from working with the Women in Music Committee of the Colorado Music Association to seeing the beginnings of the Colorado Springs Music Coalition.
This issue marks FEMMUSIC’s second Canadian Musician Issue and has been a personal joy to do. It took over a year to interview Rita di Ghent and the time we spoke didn’t last long enough. Lorraine Segato was also amazing. Coming from the States I had little knowledge of The Parachute Club, but Segato’s work speaks volumes for itself. She is an artist in many fields and her talent and skill is truly impressive. Ember Swift is a band I’ve missed seeing many times and was glad to have Sue Barrett conduct the interview with them. Porcelain Girl, Carmen Taub is a new artist who I can’t wait to see what she does next. In some ways she is still finding her voice, and in many other ways, she is screaming to all that will listen. She is not standard “pop” by any stretch of the imagination. At press time, Martina Sorbara’s interview was not complete, but it is a fun interview with a young artist who is working with many great people.
A friend this month asked one of the key questions and I thought I would speak on it. The question was, “How does an artist get that first press write-up?” As a member of the press I will fully admit that sometimes getting us to say a few words is like walking into the lion’s den. Everyone has a fear that the first review will make or break him or her. Reviewers are valuable people but any one critic’s ability to make a “star” is a falsehood. A reviewer’s job is to tell what we hear, see, feel about an artist to those who will listen. We do not go on stage. We do not go on the road. We do not walk the same path as artists do no matter how much we sound like it.
I hold every artist I speak to in high regard. Anyone who strives to work, really work in this business LIVES the music three hundred sixty-five days a year. They work to improve, to perform, to make the world better one person at a time. Reviewers and other journalists only take a snapshot of artists in moments in time. I hope, and many others do, that when we speak to someone today, that five years from now they’ll be that much better. Getting a first review is difficult but nine times out of ten it will come from a reviewer who is a fan vs. a blood hungry critic. That is why it’s always important to remember your fans. Without them your music goes unheard.
Before I conclude, I would like to thank Judy Brady for her recent praise of FEMMUSIC and Marcy Baruch. Keep up the great work Judy!
Well that’s it from the desk of the editor. Next month look for an independent music issue. Indie Artists only.

 

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November 1st, 2001

Words from the Editor’s Desk

It’s November already? The year is quickly coming to an end. Even now I’m hard at work on the December & January issues. If all goes well, by the end of November, January will be finished and I might have a week or so to enjoy the holidays.
It’s been a busy month, and items continue to come across my desk. I’ve also been involved in a lot of conversations about the mail. In light of the anthrax scares the post office is taking longer to get material anywhere. I recently had a package from California take 12 days to get to me.    FEMMUSIC is still very interested in receiving packages, and has no plans to go to EPK’s anytime soon. We consider entertainment writers to be of low concern to terrorists (domestic & foreign), and always prefer hardcopy discs, and press packs.
As we near the end of the year my calendar is already extending well into the future. I’m not quite to next summer, but getting close. The new releases in between now and then look amazing. If I was busy before, I’m not even close.
Next month will be a focus on The Best of Independent Music for 2001. It will include your top 5 choices of solo artist and bands of the year. There will also be some interview surprises, and FEMMUSIC’s picks from the label (and non-label) releases this year.
In January will be our 3rd Annual Jazz Issue. In February our 3rd Annual Blues issue, and in March our 3rd Annual Singer-Songwriter issue. I’m already excited and I don’t know whom we’ll be talking to between now and then.
Well that’s this months ramblings from the Editor’s desk. Until December…..

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March 1st, 2001

Words from the Editor’s Desk

Epiphanies

The Spring is becoming a time of transformation for me. What was static and calm is now in turmoil. As I work through it, FEMMUSIC has suffered. I’ve put a call out for writers in all categories including our FEMTech, FEMBOOKS, and others. In addition, FEMMUSIC Is also seeking writers for our still upcoming film, comedy and software columns. If you’re interested, please feel free to write me. Writing samples are required.

Being in flux is a constant for a musician and a band. You should always be learning. On that note, I’m devoting this column to a list of learning experiences every musician should have to go through. These are the epiphanies. The moments that change and transform you until the next time.

  •  Writing your first song
  • Singing out in public for the first time.
  • Your first open mic
  • Your first demo
  • Your first CD, and 2nd, and 3rd…
  • Opening for someone for the first time
  • Opening for someone you admire for the first time
  • Your first rejection by label, critic, or fan
  • Your first review
  • Your first catastrophe on stage
  • Your first autograph
  • Your first hired gun
  • Your first time in the studio
  • Your first producer, manager, publicist
  • Your first press kit
  • Your first club gig
  • Your first booking in a new town
  • Your first festival
  • Your first conference and/or showcase
  • Your first PAID gig

If I’ve missed any, or you’d like to elaborate, please e-mail me.  The best moment and story will be run in the June issue of FEMMUSIC (Our Independent Musician Issue). The winner will also receive a free CD from FEMMUSIC. Entries must be received no later than May 18.

Sincerely,
Alex Teitz
Editor-In-Chief
FEMMUSIC
[email protected]

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February 1st, 2001

Words from the Editor’s Desk

February already? The year is up to a huge start. FEMMUSIC is growing. FEMMUSIC will be adding more sections this Spring. Among the new sections are FEMMUSIC’s Film area. After last year’s TV/Film issue we’ve decided to make this a new quarterly section.

Next, FEMMUSIC is going for laughs. We’ve been talking with some comedy clubs and think that the comedy industry is a new area to explore. Look for our first interview in this area coming soon.

If that wasn’t enough , FEMMUSIC is also looking at software reviews. As a recent Palm Pilot owner, I see the potential of these devices to revolutionize how independent artists work. We will be reviewing both PC and Palm software on a sporadic basis this Spring. Depending on how the software industry takes to us, we hope to make it a regular column.

Now, to the Blues. This issue has been a hard one to pull together. Some interviews were happening up until a few days ago. It was my pleasure and honor to speak to our first Grammy Nominee of the year, Koko Taylor. Her album, Royal Blue, is up for Best Blues Album of the Year.

I was also privileged to speak to Joanna Connor, who, ironically, grew up in the same city as I did. Her insights as a blues guitarist are amazing.

If that weren’t enough, we’ve also interviewed Kate Hart, Hazel Miller and Erica Brown. Kate Hart is changing the industry with Joe Records, and we applaud her for it. Hazel Miller and Erica Brown are Colorado divas, and have interesting stories from years of experience.

Look for more to come, and keep reading.

Sincerely,
Alex Teitz
Editor-In-Chief
FEMMUSIC
[email protected]

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January 1st, 2001

Words from the Editor’s Desk

Jazz is music in motion, like liquid dreams. It pulses and thrives like no other music. FEMMUSIC is glad to have its second issue on the genre. This issue could not have been made possible if not for Jazzgrrls.com and the musicians who frequent that list. Thank you.

Doing this issue on a shortened deadline was one of the most thrilling experiences since FEMMUSIC began. By the time deadline came I’d had the pleasure of seeing our Artist of the Month, and the chance to speak with people who have universes of knowledge in the area. It was a rare treat.

Next month we’ll focus on Blues, and I can tell you that the artists for that issue amaze me. For a change, with few words…

Sincerely,
Alex Teitz
Editor-In-Chief
FEMMUSIC
[email protected]

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June 1st, 2000

Words from the Editor’s Desk

editor's desk

            The name of this column is Unfinished Mail.  Why? Every week I talk to artists, publicists, labels, and a myriad of others. Some days I can exchange up to 3-400 e-mails in a six hour period.  Somehow, even with this, I still end most weeks with 20-40 e-mails left unanswered. For those who read FEMMUSIC, and e-mail me, please understand, I’m not ignoring you. Be patient, and be persistent.

I write this just a day from FEMMUSIC’s first anniversary. One year seems to have bulldozed by leaving FEMMUSIC stronger. I’ve been thinking about writing the column ever since we began, but only in the past few months have I  finally decided to follow through. The purpose of this column, I hope, will be more than just my rants and raves. There have been many stories that make up FEMMUSIC, and this will be an area to read about them. I also hope to give insights on the business of music.

For now, you will have to suffer in hearing what one year has entailed. Some may believe that all I do is write and listen to CDs. I wish it was that easy.

Let’s begin with the numbers:

Over 200 concerts

Over 40 interviews

Over 1000 CDs received

Nearly one lawsuit

One death threat

It’s been a busy year. When FEMMUSIC began I thought I would be covering local and regional music for at least two years. Now FEMMUSIC covers the world. We’ve done many specialty issues including: Jazz/Blues, Singer-songwriter, a Chicago regional issue, and a Festival Preview Issue. In the coming months we will do even more. FEMMUSIC will have it’s first Latin Music Issue in July.

FEMMUSIC is for the artist and the people who like them. We try to be a guide for those starting out. It continues to be a learning process for us both.

I could go on for hours, but I don’t have time for that. Music and the world await. Thank you to everyone who has made FEMMUSIC a magazine worth reading in the past year. The second year we can only get better.

Sincerely,

Alex Teitz, Editor-In-Chief, FEMMUSIC

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